Suggested Calendar of Cultural Practices for Mature Atemoya Trees



From the Horticultural Sciences Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida


Month Plant stage of growth1 Cultural practices Comments
January Dormant None required Trees will be losing their leaves
February Dormant None required Trees will continue to lose their leaves or have essentially lost their leaves
March Bud break new shoot and leaf growth, flowering begins Remove dead wood, reduce long shoots by 1/3 to 1/2 New shoot and leaf growth may begin to appear
April Continued bud break, new shoot and leaf growth, flowering continues Apply NPK fertilizer, begin watering during dry periods New shoots and leaves begin to appear and/or are actively growing
May Continued bud break, new shoot and leaf growth, flowering continues, fruit set Water during dry periods, apply micronutrients New shoots and leaves growing
June Shoots and leaves continue to grow, fruit set and fruit development Water during dry periods, apply micronutrients Trees growing vigorously
July Shoots and leaves continue to grow, fruit set and fruit development Apply fertilizer, water during dry periods Trees growing vigorously
August Shoots and leaves continue to grow, fruit development, some fruit may be ready to harvest Water during dry periods, apply micronutrients Trees growing vigorously
September Shoots and leaves continue to grow, fruit development, some fruit may ready to harvest Water during dry periods, apply micronutrients Trees growing vigorously
October Shoot and leaf growth stops, fruit development, some fruit may ready to harvest Water during dry periods Tree growth is slowing
November Shoot and leaf growth stops, trees are dormant, fruit development, some fruit may ready to harvest Reduce or stop watering Tree growth has stopped, leaves begin to drop
December Shoot and leaf growth stops, trees are dormant Reduce or stop watering Tree growth has stopped, leaves begin to drop

1The dormancy of atemoya is caused by cool temperatures and/or dry soil conditions. Dormancy caused by environmental conditions is technically called quiescence.



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Bibliography

Crane, Jonathan H., Balerdi, Carlos F. and Maguire, Ian. "Atemoya Growing in the Florida Home Landscape." edis.ifas.ufl.edu. This document is HS64, one of a series of the Horticultural Sciences Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. Publication date 1980. Revised Nov. 2016. Web. 24 Apr. 2017.

Published 29 Jan. 2014 LR. Last update 24 Apr. 2017 LR
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