Atemoya Varieties



From the Horticultural Sciences Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida


There are numerous atemoya varieties; however, few have been critically evaluated for an extended period of time. The most satisfactory variety under Florida conditions has been 'Gefner' which does not require hand pollination and produces fruit of good quality. Fruit production of 'Page' is good but fruit tends to split on the tree at maturity. 'African Pride' ('Kaller') and 'Bradley' usually produce few fruit without hand pollination. 'African Pride' fruit may develop internal disorders upon ripening. Other varieties such as 'Bernitski', 'Caves', 'Chirimoriñon A', 'Chirimoriñon B', and 'Chirimoriñon C', 'Hette', 'Island Gem', 'Lindstrom', 'Kabri', 'Malali', 'Malamud', 'Mammoth' ('Pink Mammoth'), 'Priestly' and 'Stermer' have not proven viable for commercial production. The selection of superior varieties in the future is highly possible due to the numerous seedlings that are under evaluation in public and private collections.

Israeli selections tried at the University of Florida's Agricultural Research and Education Center, Homestead, and the United States Department of Agriculture's Subtropical Horticulture Research Unit, Miami, are 'Geffner', 'Malamud', 'Bernitski', 'Kabri' and 'Malai #1'. Other named selections that have been grown in Florida over the years are 'Caves', Chirimorinon A, B and C, 'Island Gem', 'Keller', 'Lindstrom', 'Priestly' and 'Stermer'. 'Geffner' is being propagated at the AREC, Homestead; 'Priestly' by the Zill Nursery in Boynton Beach. None of the others have outstanding features; some develop hard spots in the flesh. In 'Keller' there is frequently a black membrane around each seed-containing carper.


Atemoya (grafted var. 97-1)

Hybrid Custard Apple. Sweet flavor, similar to cherimoya, cream colored flesh. Very productive hybrid originated in Pine Island, Florida

'Page'

One of the first named selections of atemoya was the 'Page', so-named by Roy Page of Coral Gables who took budwood from superior atemoya trees on the property of Morrison Page in the Redlands.


Atemoya Lisa (grafted var. 48-26)

Hybrid Custard Apple. It is much hardier than common Sugar Apple, and at the same time can tolerate tropical heat unlike Cherimola which requires cooler summers. It make Atemoya an excellent choice for subtropical and tropical garden. Can tolerate light freeze. The tree growing to about twenty-five feet at maturity with about the same spread. Atemoyas have fewer seeds than Sugar Apple, which makes them a lot easier to eat as a fresh fruit.

Har Mahdeem, popular horticultural circuit speaker and authority on Annonaceae, developped this cultivar for Zill's Nursery and does not recommend using it because of it's poor production.


Atemoya (grafted var. Priestly)

Hybrid Custard Apple. All varieties are superior and aromatic. It is much hardier than common Sugar Apple, and at the same time can tolerate tropical heat unlike Cherimola which requires cooler summers. It make Atemoya an excellent choice for subtropical and tropical garden. Can tolerate light freeze. The tree growing to about twenty-five feet at maturity with about the same spread. Atemoyas have fewer seeds than Sugar Apple, which makes them a lot easier to eat as a fresh fruit.

'African Pride'

The flesh is sweet and soft and usually eaten when its fully ripe.
'African Pride' is an improved clone that originated in South Africa. It was introduced into Queensland by Langbecker Nurseries and 3,000 trees were released for commercial planting in July 1961. It was quickly adopted as a replacement for 'Mammoth' as it was free of the discoloration and bitterness next to the skin. In 1963, 6 plants of 'African Pride' were obtained from Landbecker's by private experimenters and planted at several locations in southern Florida. They began fruiting in 1965. The fruits appeared to be superior in quality to the 'Page' and 'Bradley'.


'Gefner'
Self-pollinating

It has good fruit production without hand-pollination.
Hybrid Custard Apple. It is much hardier than common Sugar Apple, and at the same time can tolerate tropical heat unlike Cherimola which requires cooler summers. It make Atemoya an excellent choice for subtropical and tropical garden. Can tolerate light freeze. The tree growing to about twenty-five feet at maturity with about the same spread. Atemoyas have fewer seeds than Sugar Apple, which makes them a lot easier to eat as a fresh fruit.
Geffner is an Israeli cultivar with a reasonable to way to copy the heavy cropping capacity. The flavour is very good and although it will performs well it's not superior to the African Pride. 'Geffner' is a productive, well known variety.


'Bradley'
Needs pollination
 
  Bradley' is less solid than Geffner varieties, but the flavor and surface are of excellent quality. ECHO staff preferred Bradley over Geffner in a 2001 in taste test. However, Bradley is reported to not fruit very well without hand-pollination.
Bradley is susceptible to root and stem decompose disease.The fruit variety is in Oblate or Ovoid in shape and it is in medium size. It looks like in greenish in color with sweet taste.
These heart shaped fruit have a medium thick skin, extra seed than the Pink's Mammoth and produces high yields. The early and steady bearing, presentable fruit and early maturing is what makes this the main commercial variety.


'Rosando Perez'

‘Rosando Perez’ bears later than most other varieties of atemoya. The fruit is elongated and of good quality. This variety has historical importance in being one of the first atemoya cultivars released by the USDA in the early 1900’s.


'Malamud'
Self-pollinating
 
   It has good fruit production without hand-pollination.
Atemoyas are small-to-medium-size trees growing to about twenty-five to thirty feet at middle age with about the same spread. Flowers are created along with new growth in the spring following a winter dormancy period, and the fruit usually begin growing in late August through the end of October.


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Bibliography

Crane, Jonathan H., Balerdi, Carlos F. and Maguire, Ian. "Atemoya Growing in the Florida Home Landscape." edis.ifas.ufl.edu. This document is HS64, one of a series of the Horticultural Sciences Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. Publication date 1980. Revised Nov. 2016. Web. 24 Apr. 2017.

Published 29 Jan. 2014 LR. Last update 24 Apr. 2017 LR
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