Watermelon - Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai
Watermelon slices
Fig. 1 

Watermelons
Fig. 2

Young shoot emerging
Fig. 6
Citrullus lanatus (Watermelon). Seedling at Greenhouse behind old galley Sand Island, Midway Atoll, Hawaii

Watermelon leaf
Fig. 7 

Watermelon vine
Fig. 8 

Male and female watermelon blossoms
Fig. 11

Watermelon flower and bud close up
Fig. 12

Citrullus lanatus (Watermelon. Fruit and flower at Hawea Pl Olinda, Maui, Hawaii
Fig. 17
Citrullus lanatus (Watermelon. Fruit and flower at Hawea Pl Olinda, Maui, Hawaii

Watermelon in a small-scale organic farm in Tainan City, Taiwan
Fig. 18
Watermelon in a small-scale organic farm in Tainan City, Taiwan

Citrullus lanatus (Watermelon). Harvested fruit yellow patch on underside of melon indicating ripe at Hawea Pl Olinda, Maui, Hawaii
Fig. 19
Citrullus lanatus (Watermelon). Harvested fruit yellow patch on underside of melon indicating ripe at Hawea Pl Olinda, Maui, Hawaii

Watermelon seeds - measurement in centimeters
Fig. 20
Watermelon seeds - measurement in centimeters

Square watermelon in Japan
Fig. 25
Square watermelon in Japan
(see info under General)

Melons in cage, Russia
Fig. 26
Melons in cage, Russia

Selling watermelons out of pickup truck on Davis Parkway, Mid-City New Orleans
Fig. 27
Selling watermelons out of pickup truck on Davis Parkway, Mid-City New Orleans

Watermelon delivery running by main street of Jiaotong Daxue campus.
Fig. 28
Watermelon delivery running by main street of Jiaotong Daxue campus

Watermerons for Vietnamese new year celebration. written happy word like "phát tài" (Get rich).
Fig. 29
Watermerons for Vietnamese new year celebration. written happy word like "phát tài" (Get rich).

Vendedoras de frutas en Cartagena de Indias, Colombia.
Fig. 30
Vendedoras de frutas en Cartagena de Indias, Colombia

Emelia Rose enjoys a novel way to get all the juice from her watermelon
Fig. 31
Emelia Rose enjoys a novel way to get all the juice from her watermelon


Scientific name
Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai
Common names
Watermelon, wild watermelon, sweet melon (English); egusi melon (English, Kenya); pastèque, melon d’eau (French)
Synonyms
C. lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai; C. lanatus (Thunb.) Mansf.; C. lanatus var. albidus (Chakrav.) Maheshw.; C. lanatus var. caffrorum (Alef.) Fosberg; C. lanatus var. capensis (Alef.) Fursa; C. lanatus var. citroides (L.H. Bailey) Mansf.; C. lanatus subsp. cordophanus Ter-Avan.; C. lanatus var. cordophanus (Ter-Avan.) Fursa; C. lanatus var. fistulosus (Steward) Babu; C. lanatus var. minor (Chakrav.) Maheshw.; C. lanatus subsp. mucosospermus Fursa; C. lanatus f. nigroseminius (Chakrav.) Maheshw.; C. lanatus var. oblongus (Chakrav.) Maheshw.; C. lanatus var. pulcherrimus (Chakrav.) Maheshw.; C. lanatus var. pumilus (Chakrav.) Maheshw.; C. lanatus var. rotundus (Chakrav.) Maheshw.; C. lanatus var. senegalicus Fursa; C. lanatus var. shami (Chakrav.) Maheshw.; C. lanatus var. variegatus (Chakrav.) Maheshw.; Citrullus lanatus var. virgatus (Chakrav.) Maheshw.; C. lanatus var. viridis (Chakrav.) Maheshw. 8
Relatives
Cucumbers (Cucumis sativus), melons (Cucumis melo, for example), loofahs (Luffa species), and pumpkins and squashes (Cucurbita species) 1
Family
Cucurbitaceae
Origin
Citrullus lanatus is thought to be native to Africa 1
USDA hardiness zones
8a-11a
Uses
Eaten raw; rind can be cooked
Spread
10 ft (3 m)
Plant habit
Vine with  long, weak, trailing or climbing stems
Growth rate
Fast; 70-100 day from seed to harvest depending on varieties
Longevity
Annual
Leaves
Deeply notched leaves, prominent veins, deep lobes and many tendrils
Flowers
Flowers are yellow with five petals and are either male or female
Fruit
Range in shape from oblong to round and vary greatly in size; smooth rind; juicy, sweet, red flesh
Season
April to July
USDA Nutrient Content pdf
Crop Yield
Only one to three fruit should be permitted to form on the vines of most cultivars
Light requirement
Full sun
Soil tolerances
Sandy, well drained soil liberally enriched with organic matter
PH preference
5.5-7.0
Drought tolerance
Need regular irrigation
Cold tolerance
Tender, damaged by frost
Plant spacing
6-8 ft (2.4-3.0 m); a rule of thumb is to allow 24 square feet per plant 9
Roots
About 12 in. (30.4 cm) deep
Invasive potential *
Not a problem species (un-documented)
Pest/Disease resistance
Susceptible to fungal diseases and some insects and mites
Known hazard
None



Reading Material

Watermelon, Seedless from the University of Florida pdf
Melons: Safe Handling Practices for Consumers from the University of Florida pdf
Home Garden Watermelon from University of Georgia UGa Extension pdf
Home Gardening Series: Watermelons from the University of Arkansas pdf 4 pages



Origin

Watermelons are indigenous to tropical Africa, where they are found wild on both sides of the equator. They were developed from a native African vine. Their cultivation by man dates back 4,000 years to the ancient Egyptians, as proven by artistic records. Watermelons spread from ancient Egypt to India and Asia and were widely distributed throughout the remainder of the world by Africans and European colonists. 7

Description
The generic name Citrullus is the diminutive of Citrus, perhaps referring to the spherical fruit. The specific epithet lanatus (meaning woolly) refers to dense woolly hairs on young parts of the plants, particularly stems. 1

Leaves
Young growth is densely woolly with yellowish-brown hairs which disappear as the plant ages. The leaves are stemmed and are alternate, large and pinnately-lobed, stiff and rough when old. The plant has branching tendrils. 10

Leaves measurement in centimetersWatermelon hairy young shoot
Fig. 9
Leaves measurement
Fig. 10
Young hairy shoot

Flowers
The flowers grow singly in the leaf axils and the corolla is white or yellow inside and greenish-yellow on the underside. The flowers are unisexual, with male and female flowers occurring on the same plant (monoecious). The male flowers predominate at the beginning of the season and the female flowers, which develop later, have inferior ovaries. The styles are united into a single column and the large fruit is a kind of modified berry called a pepo. 3

Female flowerWatermelon male flowerWatermelon flowers
Fig. 13
Female flower
Fig. 14
Male flower
Fig. 15
Measurement in cm

Fruit
It has a thick rind (exocarp) and fleshy center (mesocarp and endocarp). Wild plants have fruits up to 20 cm (8 in) in diameter while cultivated varieties may exceed 60 cm (24 in). The rind of this fruit is mid- to dark green and usually mottled or striped, and the flesh contains numerous pips and is red, orange, pink, yellow, green or white. 3
Exterior color is light to dark green and may be striped or solid. Interior is white when immature, turning red, pink or yellow at maturity. Seeds are oval, flat and smooth varying in color from creamy white to speckled to black. 1

Watermelon seedless'Moon and stars' watermelon. Cultivated in Canberra, Australia.
Fig. 3 Fig. 4
Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) with yellow flesh, bought at the Binnenrotte market in Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Fig. 5

Fig. 3. Seedless watermelon Purchased Feb. 2005 in Atlanta, GA, USA The tag had the following information: mini me (TM) Ayaco Yaco Farms Personal seedlessWatermelon #3421 Product of Nicaragua
Fig. 4. 'Moon and stars' watermelon. Cultivated in Canberra, Australia.
Fig. 5. Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) with yellow flesh, bought at the Binnenrotte market in Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Varieties
The more than 1200 cultivars of watermelon range in weight from less than one to more than 90 kilograms (200 lb); the flesh can be red, orange, yellow or white. 3

Seeded watermelon varieties available in Florida include ‘Duration’, ‘Estrella’, ‘Gold Strike’, ‘Jamboree’, ‘Mardi Gras’, ‘Regency’, ‘Royal Star’, ‘Royal Sweet’, ‘Sangria’, ‘Sentinel’, ‘Starbrite’, ‘Stars N’ Stripes’, ‘Summer Flavor 790’, ‘Summer Flavor 800’, ‘Summer Flavor 840’, and ‘Summer Flavor 900’. Seedless watermelon varieties available include ‘Crisp N’ Sweet’, ‘Crunchy Red’, ‘Freedom’, ‘Gypsy’, ‘Liberty’, ‘Matrix’, ‘Melody’, ‘Millionaire’, ‘Olympia’, ‘Revolution’, ‘Ruby Premium’, ‘Sugar Coat’, ‘Sugar Heart’, ‘Sugar Crisp 85’, ‘Summer Sweet 5244’, ‘Super Seedless 7177’, ‘Super Seedless 7178’, ‘Sweet Delight’, ‘Sweet Polly’, ‘Sweet Treasure’, ‘Tri-X-212’, ‘Tri-X-313’, ‘Tri-X-Palomar’, and ‘Triton’ (Olson et al. 2012).
The best yielding seedless watermelon varieties are the 'Supersweet,', 'Genesis', 'Millionaire', Scarlet Trio', Tiffany. Tri-X-313', 'Crimson Jewel', 'King of Hearts' and 'Tycoon'. 4
If you're looking for something a little different, consider the heirloom variety 'Moon & Stars'. This is not your typical-looking watermelon; 'Moon & Stars' (Fig. 4) produces dark green melons that have small and large yellow dots that resemble a glowing moon surrounded by twinkling stars. 6
Good Reasons for Icebox Melons from Sunset Publication pdf
Watermelon Variety Descriptions from Washington State University

Harvesting
Watermelon can be harvested anytime between 70 and 90 days depending on the variety. Look for a curly tendril at the stem. The watermelon is ready to be picked when the tendril opposite the fruit stem is completely dry. Other signs of ripeness include yellowing of the underside of the fruit (Fig. 19) and a dull thump sound when tapping the fruit. 2
Unlike cantaloupes, watermelons will not continue to ripen after harvest. 5
Whole watermelon will stay fresh for about two weeks if it is stored at a temperature below 60 degrees F. At room temperature, it will keep for seven to 10 days. For optimum taste, place the melon in the refrigerator to cool prior to eating. Watermelon is a great, low-calorie, sweet treat with lots of nutritional value that can be enjoyed throughout the summer. 2
Florida has a great climate for growing watermelon, and is actually a leading producer for the nation. While it's generally considered a summer fruit, growers in Florida are lucky enough to be able to plant watermelon for harvest in the winter as well. In fact, Florida is the only state in the country that produces watermelon from December to April. 6
Note: Once a watermelon is removed from the vine, it will no longer be able to become sweeter.

Pollination
Bees are essential for cucurbit production. It has been estimated that eight or more visits per blossom are necessary for optimum fruit set and normal fruit development in watermelon. The morning hours are most critical for pollination, but bees will continue to forage into the afternoon. 4
Beekeeping: Watermelon Pollination from the University of Florida pdf

Lasioglossum malachurum, female foraging on a watermelon flower, Hulda, Judean Foothills, Israel
Fig. 16

Fig. 16. Lasioglossum malachurum, female foraging on a watermelon flower, Hulda, Judean Foothills, Israel

Propagation
Watermelons can be grown either by direct seeding or by using transplants. Plant one to two seeds per pot. Cover the seeds with the soil or potting mix, and keep them in a warm place with good light. Indoors, supplemental light may be required to promote sturdy growth and prevent plants from becoming leggy. Set up lights 6 to 12 inches above the plants, and keep them on for about 14 hours a day. Be sure to keep the soil and plants moist using a fine mist. Harden the plants off before transplanting them into the garden. This can be done by leaving them outside for two or three days, but bringing them back inside each night. On the fourth day, leave them outside for 24 hours. 2
Under normal conditions watermelons grown from transplants can be harvested as much as two weeks earlier than melons grown directly from seed. 9

Culture
Plant watermelon from seed in small hills with a spacing of 8 feet on all sides. Sow four to five seeds per hill at a depth of 1 inch. A week after they have germinated, thin the seedlings to two per hill. 2
Watermelon is a warm-season vegetable in the cucurbiteae family. It requires a lot of space, sunshine, water and nutrients. If you have extra room in the garden, watermelons can be fun and interesting to grow. Watermelons need a well-drained soil that receives eight to 10 hours of sunlight per day. The plants need plenty of room and should be kept weed free, nipping out the growing tips when the stems are two metres (yards) long. 3
Watermelons are tropical or subtropical plants and need temperatures higher than about 25 °C (77 °F) to thrive. 3
Try not to disturb or move the vines as the plants grow, even to weed. If you disturb the vines, you can interrupt the flow of nutrients to the melons which increases the risk that the melons will ripen on one side, but stay green on the other side.  11

Grow the Juiciest Melons Ever from the Weekend Gardener Magazine

Fertilization
Melons are heavy feeders and from the time they start growing until the first flower appears, melons need a steady supply of nutrients. A good formula is to mix a solution of 1 to 2 tablespoons (15 to 30 ml) of fish emulsion in 1 gallon (3.8 l) of water and apply it weekly when the plants are young.
An application of a kelp-based foliar spray when the plants are in full flower will complete fertilization. 11

Irrigation
Watermelons need a lot of water. In fact, water comprises 92 percent of the watermelon fruit. Surprisingly, the bulk of watermelon roots are found in the top 12 inches of soil. Consequently when watering try and apply only as much water as the root zone (top 12”) can hold. Proper watering may require several short duration water cycles during the day. 9

Problems
Poorly formed fruit can be due to several problems, the lack of pollination by bees is the most common cause. Blossom-end rot is primarily due to inadequate calcium in the plant. Too little calcium can be due to several problems which include low soil pH, low calcium and irregularly available water. To reduce blossom-end rot, maintain consistent amounts of available water in the plant root zone. All vines and little fruit are usually due to over-fertilizing with nitrogen fertilizer or planting too close. 9

Pests Page


Diseases Page

Food Uses
Watermelon rinds are also edible, but most people avoid eating them due to their unappealing flavor. They are used for making pickles, and sometimes used as a vegetable. 
The rind is stir-fried, stewed or more often pickled, and pickled watermelon rind is also sometimes eaten in the Southern US.
Watermelon juice can be made into wine, on its own or blended with other fruits. An alcoholic treat called a "hard watermelon" is made by pouring liquor into a hole in the rind of a whole fruit, and then eating the alcohol-permeated flesh. 3
In China, the seeds are esteemed and eaten with other seeds at Chinese New Year celebrations. 10

Watermelon agua frescaThe Eclipse Watermelon Martini cocktail, with vodka and watermelon. This is their house speciality I believe, and lovely it was too. We had two. At Eclipse, Walton StreetAmuse bouche: Watermelon brûlée, watermelon juice with sherry.Watermelon murabba (varenye)
Fig. 21 Fig. 22 Fig. 23 Fig. 24

Fig. 21. Watermelon agua fresca
Fig. 22. The Eclipse Watermelon Martini cocktail, with vodka and watermelon. This is their house speciality I believe, and lovely it was too. We had two. At Eclipse, Walton Street
Fig. 23. Amuse bouche: Watermelon brûlée, watermelon juice with sherry
Fig. 24. Watermelon murabba (varenye, Russian for fruit preserves)

Medicinal Uses **
A study from Purdue University and University of Kentucky showed that mice fed a diet including watermelon juice had lower weight, cholesterol and arterial plaque than a control group. The findings, reported in the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, suggest that citrulline, a compound found in watermelon, plays a role in cardiovascular health.
The findings, reported in the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, suggest that citrulline, a compound found in watermelon, plays a role in cardiovascular health. The National Institutes of Health, through the University of Kentucky's Center for Biomedical Excellence In Obesity and Cardiovascular Disease, funded the study. 12

General
In Tokyo store space is very limited, but there are a lot of customers to sell to. The stores however, can't have round watermelons because they take up too much room, and they have too much empty space around them.
No problem. They came up with the idea to grow melons inside a box, and when they're fully grown, they simply take them out of the box and can be stacked. It cuts down on transportation costs, and the grocery stores can handle them better. 11

Further Reading
Is Watermelon a Fruit or Vegetables? from watermelon.org pdf
Watermelon from Clemson University pdf
Florida Watermelon Association ext. link
Watermelon Botanical Art


List of Growers and Vendors
Bibliography

1 "Watermelon (Citrullus lunatus)." edis.ifas.ufl.edu. Plant Identification Learning Module: Vegetables. Web. 15 Oct. 2014.
2 Florkowaska, Malgorzata and Westerfield, Robert R. "Home Garden Watermelon." extension.uga.edu. Dec. 2013. Web. 14 Oct. 2014.
3 "Watermelon". wikipedia.org. Web. 15 Oct. 2014.
4 Webb, S.E. "Insect Management for Cucurbits (Cucumber, Squash, Cantaloupe , and Watermelon." edis.ifas.ufl.edu. This document is ENY-460 (IG168), one of a series of the Entomology & Nematology Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. Published Aug. 2001. Revised June 2013. Web. 18 Oct. 2014.
5 Elwakil, Wael M. and Mossler, Mark A. "Florida Crop/Pest Management Profile: Watermelon." edis.ifas.ufl.edu. This document is CIR1236, one of a series of the Horticultural Sciences Department, UF/IFAS Extension. Publication date Oc. 2000. Latest revision Aug.2013. Web. 21 Oct. 2014.
6 "Watermelon." gardeningsolution.ifas.ufl.edu. Web. 13 June 2016.
7 Andersen, Craig R. "Home Gardening Series: Watermelons." uaex.edu. University of Arkansas, division of Agriculture. 2011. Web. 16 June 2016.
8 "Citrullus lanatus synonyms." theplantlist.org. Web. 20 June 2016.
9 Miller, Gilbert. "Watermelons." clemsonedu. Clemson University and South Carolina State University. South Carolina Cooperative Extension. Original publication June 1999. Revised August 2014. Web. 20 June 2016.
10 Shiu-ying Hu. Food Plants of China. Chinese University Press. p. 125. 2005. Print
11 Rinaldi, Hilary. "Grow The Juiciest Melons Ever."weekendgardener.net. Sept. 2013. Web. 15 Oct. 2014.
12 Wallheimer, Brian. "Watermelon shown to boost heart health, control weight gain in mice." purdue.edu/newsroom/index. Agriculture News Page. 12 Oct. 2012. Web. 23 June 2016.

Photographs

Fig. 1 Farbs01. Watermelon. 2012. flickr.com. Under (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0). Web. 16 June 2016.
Fig. 2,7,8 Watermelons, watermelonvine and watermelon leaf. N.d. University of Florida. edis.ifas.ufl.edu. Web. 15 Oct. 2014.
Fig. 3 Ehardt, Scott. Seedless watermelon Purchased Feb. 2005 in Atlanta, GA, USA The tag had the following information: mini me (TM) Ayaco Yaco Farms Personal seedlessWatermelon #3421 Product of Nicaragua. 2005. commons.wikimedia.org. Web. 16 June 2016.
Fig. 4 Nadiatalent. 'Moon and stars' watermelon. Cultivated in Canberra, Australia. 2008. commons.wikimedia.org. Under (CC BY-SA 3.0). Web. 15 June 2016.
Fig. 5 Hans B.~commonswiki. Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) with yellow flesh, bought at the Binnenrotte market in Rotterdam, The Netherlands. 2006. commons.wikimedia.org. Web. 15 June 2016.
Fig. 6 Starr, Forest and Kim. Citrullus lanatus (Watermelon). Seedling at Greenhouse behind old galley Sand Island, Midway Atoll, Hawaii. 2008. flickr.com. Under (CC BY 2.0). Web. 16 June 2016.
Fig. 9 S.L. Tan. Watermelon leaves. Measurement in centimeter. 2009. commons.wikimedia.org. Under (CC BY-SA 3.0). Web. 16 June 2016.
Fig. 10 S.L. Tan. Watermelon young shoot. 2009. commons.wikimedia.org. Under (CC BY-SA 3.0). Web. 16 June 2016.
Fig. 11 Pollinator. Flower stems of male and female watermelon blossoms, showing ovary on the female. 2006. commons.wikimedia.org. Under (CC BY-SA 3.0). Web. 16 June 2016.
Fig. 12 S.L. Tan. Watermelon flower and flower bud. 2009. commons.wikimedia.org. Under (CC BY-SA 3.0). Web. 16 June 2016.
Fig. 13 Roberto94. Watermelon flower female. 2008. commons.wikimedia.org. Under GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 and (CC BY 3.0). Web. 15 June 2016.
Fig. 14 Roberto94. Watermelon flower male. 2008. commons.wikimedia.org. Under GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 and (CC BY 3.0). Web. 15 June 2016.
Fig. 15 S.L. Tan. Watermelon neasurement in Centimeter. 2009. commons.wikimedia.org. Under (CC BY-SA 3.0). Web. 16 June 2016.
Fig. 16 Pisanty, Gideon(Gidip). Lasioglossum malachurum, female on a watermelon flower, Hulda, Judean Foothills, Israel. 2011. commons.wikimedia.org. Under (CC BY 3.0). Web. 15 June 2016.
Fig. 17 Starr, Forest and Kim. Citrullus lanatus (Watermelon. Fruit and flower at Hawea Pl Olinda, Maui, Hawaii. 2012. flickr.com. Under (CC BY 2.0). Web. 16 June 2016.
Fig. 18 Hsu, Fred. Taiwan 2009 Tainan City Organic Farm Watermelon. 2009. commons.wikimedia.org. Under (CC BY-SA 3.0). Web. 16 June 2016.
Fig. 19 Starr, Forest and Kim. Citrullus lanatus (Watermelon). Harvested fruit yellow patch on underside of melon indicating ripe at Hawea Pl Olinda, Maui, Hawaiiflickr.com. Under (CC BY 2.0). Web. 16 June 2016.
Fig. 20 Vincentz, Frank. Mature watermelon seeds. 2007. commons.wikimedia.org. Web. 15 Oct. 2014.
Fig. 21 Joy. Watermelon agua fresca. 2014. commons.wikimedia.org. Under (CC BY 2.0). the-cooking-of-joy.blogspot.com/2014/07/watermelon-agua-fresca. Web. 15 June 2016.
Fig. 22 Munro, Ewan. The Eclipse Watermelon Martini cocktail, with vodka and watermelon. This is their house speciality I believe, and lovely it was too. We had two. At Eclipse, Walton Street. 2011. commons.wikimedia.org. Under (CC BY-SA 2.0). Web. 16 June 2016.
Fig. 23 soupstance. Amuse bouche: Watermelon brûlée, watermelon juice with sherry. 2008. flickr.com. Under (CC BY 2.0). Web. 16 June 2016.
Fig. 24 Georgia About. Watermelon murabba (varenye, Russian for fruit preserves). 2014. commons.wikimedia.org. (CC BY 3.0).
GeorgianRecipes.net. Web. 16 June 2016.
Fig. 25 Laughlin. Cubic Watermelon from Japan. 2005. commons.wikimedia.org. Web. 15 Oct. 2014.
Fig. 26 savage19. Melons in cage, Russia. 2011. commons.wikimedia.org. Under (CC BY-SA 3.0). Web. 15 June 2016.
Fig. 27 Everson, Bart. Selling watermelons out of pickup truck on Davis Parkway, Mid-City New Orleans. 2011. commons.wikimedia.org. Under (CC BY 2.0). Web. 15 June 2016.
Fig. 28 Antonini, Carla. Watermelon delivery running by main street of Jiaotong Daxue campus. 2007. commons.wikimedia.org. Under (CC BY-SA 3.0). Web. 15 June 2016.
Fig. 29 Tonbi ko. Watermerons for Vietnamese new year celebration. written happy word like "phát tài" (Get rich). 2015. commons.wikimedia.org. Under (CC BY-SA 4.0). Web. 15 June 2016.
Fig. 30 Villa, Luz A. Vendedoras de frutas en Cartagena de Indias, Colombia. 2008. flickr.com. Under (CC BY 2.0). Web. 16 June 2016.
Fig. 31 Burchett, Valerie. "Emelia Rose enjoys a novel way to get all the juice from her watermelon." Print. 16 June 2016.

*   UF/IFAS Assessment of Non-native Plants in Florida's Natural Areas
** The information provided above is not intended to be used as a guide for treatment of medical conditions using plants.

Published 15 Oct. 2014 LR. Last Update 23 June 2016 LR
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